Mike Schaeffer's Weblog
Thu, 12 Feb 2009
Experience and Dogma
In the recent debate surronding the SOLID Principles of Object Oriented Design, the following two quotes stood out.

"Last week I was listening to a podcast on Hanselminutes, with Robert Martin talking about the SOLID principles. ... And, when I was listening to them, they all sounded to me like extremely bureaucratic programming that came from the mind of somebody that has not written a lot of code, frankly."

Joel Spolsky


"Reading The Ferengi Programmer by Jeff Atwood really made me quite concerned. Here.s clearly an opinion which to me seems not grounded in sustained experience..."

Dhananjay Nene


Both of these are speculative slights on someone else's experience level, either generally or with a particular bit of technology. Bad rhetorical technique aside, my guess is that these are rooted in a fundamental lack of trust that the other side might actually have a well thought out reason for their point of view. This is an easy trap to fall into, particularly in a field as subjective as software design. Take the 'editor wars' as an example: which is better, Emacs, vi, or a full featured IDE? I don't know the answer to this question, but I do know that I can find people that will tell me I'm wrong for prefering Emacs. Change the debate to something a bit more relevant, something like the design of a large piece of software, and people get even more vitriolic.

At least part of the solution to this problem is plain, old trust. Think about a good developer that's moved into a lead role: it's easy to see how they might care enough about a particular design point to impose that on their team, either by implementing it themselves or by dictate. Where the trust comes in is in avoiding that trap. If I impose a choice on my team, I limit their ability to explore the design space themselves, take their own risks, and then potentially fail. I also limit their ability to correct my own misconceptions... if I think I'm right enough to mandate a design, I also probably think I'm right enough to ignore you and do my own thing anyway. Ironically enough, this makes the combination of conviction and risk aversion its own risk, and potentially a big one without a counterbalance. (From a personal level, if you go around imposing your will and/or ignoring points of view, you also lose the opporunity to learn from those around you.)

And this is where the bit about rhetorical technique comes into play. As satisfying as it can be to say that somebody you disagree with "...has not written a lot of code, frankly.", it's really beside the point. It doesn't matter, even were it true. What matters more to reasonable discussions about engineering technique are specific and testable statements: something like "Interface Segregation will help keep defect rates by promoting better unit tests." You may or may not agree with this statement, but it's more likely to lead to a relevant conversation than slights on experience or dogmatic declarations of opinion as fact. Several years ago I was told in no uncertain terms that I had made a design choice that 'wasn't scalable'. I ran some tests and came back with some numbers that showed my choice satisfied our requirements. Who do you think won that debate, the buzzword or the numbers? Specifics and testability can count for a lot. Dogma, not so much.

To be fair, most of the two blog posts I mention above are focused on meatier material than my quotes imply. I particularly liked Atwood's conclusion that "Rules, guidelines, and principles are gems of distilled experience that should be studied and respected. But they're never a substute [sic] for thinking critically about your work." For experienced developers, I expect that Nene would also agree. After all, he writes that "you have the experience on your side to generally make the right judgement calls and you are likely to anyway apply them under most of the cases." In a sense, both are arguing the same thing, namely that judgement ultimately drives the design process over strict adherence to a set of rules. The difference is that Nene takes it a few steps further and draws the conclusion that good developers produce good code, good code is SOLID, and Atwood's blog post is either useless or harmful. Maybe there are some valid points here, but they're obscured by a dogmatism that is more of a distraction than a productive way to think about software design.

reddit this! Digg Me!

[/tech/programming] permanent link